Doings of Interest

Robin Spriggs as The Man - tight crop - antiqueFor all my friends who have been curious enough and kind enough to inquire, following is a brief list of my current “doings of interest.”

Item: Polishing up Baltazar Bumbertazm’s Book of Ineffable Drooms, a comprehensive collection of prose poetry that I hope to have turned in to the publisher by early 2017.

Item: Will appear as “Harley” on the TV drama Containment, premiering on The CW in early 2016.

Item: Will appear as “The Man” in the off-kilter indie comedy Gilda Sue Rosenstern: The Motion Picture! in late 2016.

Item: Closing in on completing the design of a fast-paced adventure board game featuring a host of all your favorite characters from The Wyrd City Chronicles.

Item: Currently at work on a new collection of fiction, also promised to a publisher but whose title and subject matter must remain, for the nonce, undisclosed.

Item: Will soon begin autographing 500 signature pages for a special edition of Madhouse, a shared-world horror anthology due out from Dark Regions Press sometime in 2016.

Item: About to begin work (as an actor) on the second season of a super exciting TV series (emphasis on the word “super”) that I’m not yet allowed to discuss. So let’s just leave it at that.

That’s enough for now, I think.

Thanks, dear friends, for your kindness and curiosity. Go forth and make big magic!

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Glimpses of Droom #2

Conjuring - smallFootnote #12

“His alleged fetish for eyes, it is important to note, is said to have been more intellectual and spiritual than sexual in nature. Be that as it may, according to several anonymous correspondents, it did indeed manifest in the practice of oculolinctus, though in a context so reverent and ritualized as to pass for an act of sacrament. Various texts contained within The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom (“Eye Candy,” “I of the Beholder,” “Eyes and Gnosis,” “If Thine Eye Be Single,” “Liber I,” etc.)—although not offered as confirmation of these assertions—should nevertheless prove of considerable interest to readers of a speculative bent.”—The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom

The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom

Behold! The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom“Spriggs evokes terror and awe . . . in this dazzling anti-story, a love letter to the weird.” —Publishers Weekly

“A hard-to-describe yet highly entertaining compilation, The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom is an experience weird fiction fans should not pass up.”—Rue Morgue

“Fanciful, sly, and always brilliant, author Robin Spriggs evokes a splendid world of eccentric darkness that is his and his alone.”—Tomb of Dark Delights

Glimpses of Droom #1

Ozman Droom in

Ozman Droom in “Ozmandroomunculus”

“It turns Its eye, Its single eye, from dream to dream to dream, and spies in each a dream undreamt of tales as yet untold, of Monstrous Things that cannot be yet come to be withal, upon a whirling sphere of blue (inward grown and lost to time), where Then and Now, and Here and There, and You and It . . . are One.”—The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom

“Ozmandroomunculus”

Ozmandroomunculus - Poster“By no means,” said a certain gentleman diabolist, “is the film an adaptation of the book whose title it dimly recalls, but rather what amounts to something of a cinematic appendage—or tentacle, if you will—unfurled from the innermost fane of the text in question to probe the psychosphere for minds more attuned to images and music than to words, therein to proclaim itself ‘an artist’s meditation on the nature of creativity,’ or, even more pretentiously (though no less sincerely), ‘a performative depiction of the mysterious process whereby all works of the imagination conjure themselves into being.’”

 

  • Written and Directed by Robin Spriggs
  • Photographed and Edited by Kelly O’Neal
  • Scored and Soundscaped by Klimchak
  • Introducing Ada le Fay as “Scucca”
  • Synopsis: A gentleman diabolist and his hirsute familiar perform an unspeakable rite.
  • Tagline: Stranger than the sum of its parts.
  • Running Time: 7 minutes
  • Production Company: Mean Mama Dog
  • Status: Post-production

An Objective Take (or Three or Four) on “The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom”

Ozman Droom - cover imageFor those who might appreciate an early and objective opinion on The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom (I certainly did), here’s a link to a review in Publishers Weekly.

Other impressions have begun to appear hither and yon, most notably on Goodreads, for which I am equally grateful.

Ordinarily, for the sake of my creative process, I avoid paying undue attention to reviews, but bringing this particular book back from the underworld was such a strange and troublous task that I’m delighted to find it resonating with at least an honest few.

In a life crammed to bursting with things that must be done, choosing which books are worthy of your time is a matter of no small importance. So whether my sharing of these early views leads you to or from The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom, I will have done a good deed for the day, and will sleep all the better tonight.

Thanks for reading, friends.

Ä’Zma’n-d’Rüm!

“The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom”

Ozman Droom - cover imageBetween You & Me – Issue 1

I’ve received quite a few questions about The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom over the past couple of years, most of them of the frequently asked variety—and with good reason, given the tardiness of the book’s promised release. Rather than continuing to field these queries individually as they land in my various inboxes, I’ve decided to address them below in a public Q&A that will be the first installment of an ongoing series entitled Between You & Me.*

  • Will The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom ever be published?

Yes.

  • When will The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom be published?

As of my last communication with the publisher, and according to this listing on Amazon, the expected release date is August 1, 2014, so I’m hoping to see the book no later than that.

  • Some on-line sources say that The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom will be published by Double Feature Press. Others say it will be published by Anomalous Books. Which is correct?

The long answer: Several years ago, Sarah L. Covert approached me about being part of what was to be the maiden voyage of her newly formed publishing company, Double Feature Press. Her plan was to pair a slim collection of stories by me with one by Joseph S. Pulver Sr., a writer whose work I hold in high regard, and to publish them as a single volume—a sort of literary analogue/homage to the once popular motion picture phenomenon known as the “double feature” and somewhat reminiscent of the tête-bêche paperbacks made popular by Ace Books in the 1950s, 60s, and early 70s.

Intrigued by the idea and already tinkering with something I thought would be a good fit for the DFP format, I agreed to take part. Unfortunately, however, my progress toward that goal was  interrupted on several occasions by stints of work in film and TV. Further complicating matters, my intended contribution had begun to grow into something a good deal longer and more idiosyncratic than was suitable for a two-in-one package, not to mention too elusive and cantankerous for a certain word-slingin’ cowboy to saddle up and ride. So, greatly disappointed, I advised Sarah to proceed without me, interred the manuscript in my private potter’s field of ill-conceived undertakings, and turned my attention to projects of a more tractable, less daunting nature.

But the book just wouldn’t stay buried; it dogged me day and night—mostly at night—driving me out of bed, back to the altar, back to the page. And little by little, spoken of to no one and unacknowledged even to myself, The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom clawed its way into being. When it was done, I had no idea what to make of such a thing, and little hope that anyone would want to publish it. But much to my surprise, several publishers showed interest. Foremost among them—in passion if not in size—was J. P. Fortner (of Anomalous Books), who, fortunately for me, seems to be something of a glutton for punishment when it comes to my particular brand of auctorial deviance.

To make a long story a little less so, I weighed my options and decided to go with Anomalous Books. The key factors in my choice were J. P.’s enthusiasm (it’s difficult to say no to someone who displays such a pronounced and abiding fondness for one’s work), his editorial acumen (he never fails to improve upon whatever I send his way), and his attention to typographical detail (a rarer trait than one might think among modern-day publishers and editors). Do not, by the way, underestimate the importance of this third and final factor; in recent years, I have seen several of my works severely disfigured by the abysmal copy editing and typesetting of editors and/or publishers who either don’t know better (should find another line of work) or who do know better but don’t give a damn (should be knouted and punched in the throat).

So there you have it: The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom will be published by Anomalous Books. Whatever the outcome—and your opinion of it—J. P. Fortner deserves at least half the thanks, and yours truly no less than all the blame.

The short answer: See the paragraph immediately above.

  • The bibliography on your web site lists The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom twice, once as a book and once a novelette. Which is correct?

Both. The book entitled The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom contains a novelette entitled “The Untold Tale of Ozman Droom.” The novelette serves as the linchpin piece for the cycle of stories of which the book is composed.

  • Is The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom a novel or a short-story collection?

A bit of the former, much of the latter, and altogether something else.

That’s all for now, friends. If you would like to see your question added to those above or included in a future installment of Between You & Me, feel free to send it my way. Your interest is appreciated and your correspondence welcome.

———

*I am not a blogger. On the rare occasions I have anything to say that is worth the effort of writing down and that I think—in a fit of self-delusion—others might find of interest, the words take the form of a story, poem, or essay that on even rarer occasions ends up in a bona fide book. Unfortunately, this aesthetic sensibility, combined with an innate seclusiveness at odds with the cyber age, is widely mistaken by readers (both actual and potential) for casual indifference or outright disregard. Hence this Q&A—an ongoing, if sporadic, series entitled Between You & Me.** It is my sincere, though admittedly inelegant, effort to trick myself into providing more content and into being at least a trifle more accessible to those who are kind enough, concerned enough, or curious enough to care.

**The questions in Between You & Me are quoted verbatim from actual correspondence. The answers, though honest,  are but rough approximations of my own.

Join “The Dance” in the Latest Issue of “Lovecraft eZINE”

Lovecraft eZineQuite a few readers (and bless their hearts for caring) have complained that none of my work is available in electronic format.  This news is for them.

“The Dance”—one of my little prose poems/nano fables/micro tales—awaits your perusal in issue #22 of the always stellar Lovecraft eZineaccompanied by a delightfully macabre illustration from a certain Nick “The Hat” Gucker.

Edited by Mike Davis, this issue of Lovecraft eZine also includes stories by Samantha Henderson, Simon Kurt Unsworth, Don Webb, Joe Nazare, David Conyers and John Goodrich, as well as art by Steve Santiago, Adam Baker, Robert Elrod, and Dominic Black.

And for those who prefer listening to reading, an audio edition of the entire issue—elocuted by Chaz Engan, Morgan Scorpion, Vincent LaRosa, Lou Columbus, and David Binks—is available directly from Lovecraft eZine.

Thanks for reading, friends.

Ä’Zma’n-d’Rüm!