Daemon Unbound: The Lost Conjurations of Ozman Droom

Daemon Unbound: The Lost Conjurations of Ozman Droom. As many of my faithful readers know, the existence of this album/soundtrack/musical oddity, along with its merits and purported perils, has been a hotly debated topic among musicologists and occultists alike since the mid-to-late 1970s. Those who swear to its existence, however, have never been able (or seen fit) to produce any evidence to support their fervid and often bizarre claims. So it was with great interest, and more than a little bemusement, that I received the following materials on Imbolg of this year, sent via e-mail from a certain “Simon Magus” and attributed to the legendary Villa 9 Studios.

At first I thought it best to keep these materials to myself, but after a fortnight of intense contemplation and half a dozen rituals of half a dozen sorts, I have decided to post them here for the edification of any interested parties, and for closer examination by any esotericists willing to undertake the task.

For further information of an intensely interesting variety, see the liner notes included on the gatefold image below, and do let me know if they jibe with (or contradict) any personal recollections or experiences that you yourself have had with Daemon Unbound: The Lost Conjurations of Ozman Droom.

 

From the liner notes on the above gatefold:

Over the past several decades, a growing number of individuals, with nothing to offer as proof save their own vague recollections, have attested to the existence (or rather past existence) of an obscure and enigmatic album called Daemon Unbound: The Lost Conjurations of Ozman Droom.

Some attestants describe said album as having been an aural companion piece to a book of dubious authorship and sinister reputation entitled The Untold Tales of Ozman Droom. Others insist that the album was a soundtrack to a film or TV series pilot they recalled being traumatized by as children but have since been unable to track down or to verify to the satisfaction of objective skeptics. Still others aver, though always off the record, that the album served as an elaborate incantation or psychosonic hypersigil whose power and scope grew greater and more beguiling with each new listener but whose ultimate purpose is yet to be revealed.

All such suggestions, though admittedly intriguing and excellent fodder for midwinter ghost stories, could be dismissed as little more than urban myth and far-flung fancy—until recently, that is, when a reel-to-reel master recording of the album in question turned up in West Lothian, Scotland, among the archives of the infamous and ill-fated Villa 9 Studios.

Dated 1973 and performed by The Holy See with Robin Spriggs (the latter a name that some allege is a pseudonym for Ozman Droom himself), the recording consists of twenty-one tracks of haunting melodies, trippy leitmotifs, weird soundscapes, and spoken-word diablerie that, taken as a whole, form an arabesque ritual of decidedly potent effect.

The significance of this unsettling discovery we leave to you, the listener, to whom we now proudly, though with considerable trepidation, present this newly mastered edition of Daemon Unbound: The Lost Conjurations of Ozman Droom. Partake of it if and as you wish, but with the full knowledge that, in so doing, you have willingly aligned yourself with whatever mysterious energies, transcendental intentions, and unaccounted-for entities have brought it into being.

Ä’Zma’n-d’Rüm

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Doings of Interest

Robin Spriggs as The Man - tight crop - antiqueFor all my friends who have been curious enough and kind enough to inquire, following is a brief list of my current “doings of interest.”

Item: Polishing up Baltazar Bumbertazm’s Book of Ineffable Drooms, a comprehensive collection of prose poetry that I hope to have turned in to the publisher by early 2017.

Item: Will appear as “Harley” on the TV drama Containment, premiering on The CW in early 2016.

Item: Will appear as “The Man” in the off-kilter indie comedy Gilda Sue Rosenstern: The Motion Picture! in late 2016.

Item: Closing in on completing the design of a fast-paced adventure board game featuring a host of all your favorite characters from The Wyrd City Chronicles.

Item: Currently at work on a new collection of fiction, also promised to a publisher but whose title and subject matter must remain, for the nonce, undisclosed.

Item: Will soon begin autographing 500 signature pages for a special edition of Madhouse, a shared-world horror anthology due out from Dark Regions Press sometime in 2016.

Item: About to begin work (as an actor) on the second season of a super exciting TV series (emphasis on the word “super”) that I’m not yet allowed to discuss. So let’s just leave it at that.

That’s enough for now, I think.

Thanks, dear friends, for your kindness and curiosity. Go forth and make big magic!

Courting the Devil

Robin Spriggs as The Man - tight crop - antiqueA Guest Column by Gilda Sue Rosenstern

When I first began putting down ideas for what would become Gilda Sue Rosenstern: The Motion Picture!, there was one role that, due to its eerie but oddly charming nature, I couldn’t imagine anyone playing but Robin Spriggs.

In addition to being an accomplished actor, Robin also happens to be the author of some of the strangest but most beautiful books I’ve ever read. Plus, he’s a magician, and I don’t mean the stage kind either. So I sent him a description of the character I had in mind (a sort of interdimensional gypsy-cowboy) and asked if he was interested. Much to my delight (and a little to my dread), he said yes.

Later on, as I found myself vajazzle-deep in the writing of the actual screenplay (my first, I might add) and feeling not a little meshuga, I thought, “Wait a minute, Gilda Sue. You’ve got Robin damn Spriggs in your cast. Why not wise up and ask him to sign on as co-writer, too?” So I did. And again he said yes. That’s when things got really strange—not only in the movie about my life, but in my very life itself. Big shock, I know. But the real shock, especially if you’re only familiar with Robin’s spookier qualities, was how funny he turned out to be. And I do mean “funny ha ha.”

So yes, as expected, Robin Spriggs brought the strange to Gilda Sue Rosenstern: The Motion Picture!, but he also brought a whole lot of hilarity. And magic, too, of course. So color me triple blessed. And triple grateful, too.

—Gilda Sue Rosenstern

P.S. Gilda Sue Rosenstern: The Motion Picture! is finally in the can. That means we’ve shot it, but it doesn’t mean it’s done. If you’re a fan of Robin Spriggs and would like to play a part in unleashing this crazy bit of uniqueness on the world, you can do so by contributing to our post-production Kickstarter campaign. Thank you in advance for your love and patronage, and welcome to the team. Bye now!